Wednesday, December 29, 2010

The Incremental Model

The incremental model combines elements of the linear sequential model (applied
repetitively) with the iterative philosophy of prototyping.  the
incremental model applies linear sequences in a staggered fashion as calendar time
progresses. Each linear sequence produces a deliverable “increment” of the software
. For example, word-processing software developed using the incremental
paradigm might deliver basic file management, editing, and document production
functions in the first increment; more sophisticated editing and document production
capabilities in the second increment; spelling and grammar checking in the third
increment; and advanced page layout capability in the fourth increment. It should be
noted that the process flow for any increment can incorporate the prototyping paradigm.
When an incremental model is used, the first increment is often a core product.
That is, basic requirements are addressed, but many supplementary features (some
known, others unknown) remain undelivered. The core product is used by the customer
(or undergoes detailed review). As a result of use and/or evaluation, a plan is
developed for the next increment. The plan addresses the modification of the core
product to better meet the needs of the customer and the delivery of additional
features and functionality. This process is repeated following the delivery of each
increment, until the complete product is produced.

The incremental process model, like prototyping  and other evolutionary
approaches, is iterative in nature. But unlike prototyping, the incremental
model focuses on the delivery of an operational product with each increment. Early
increments are stripped down versions of the final product, but they do provide capability
that serves the user and also provide a platform for evaluation by the user.
Incremental development is particularly useful when staffing is unavailable for a
complete implementation by the business deadline that has been established for the
project. Early increments can be implemented with fewer people. If the core product
is well received, then additional staff (if required) can be added to implement the next
increment. In addition, increments can be planned to manage technical risks.

 For example, a major system might require the availability of new hardware that is under
development and whose delivery date is uncertain. It might be possible to plan early
increments in a way that avoids the use of this hardware, thereby enabling partial
functionality to be delivered to end-users without inordinate delay.

5 comments:

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  3. What are the examples of incremental model????

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